Your donation will make a difference:
Cystic Fibrosis Trust

What legacies achieve

People with cystic fibrosis are living longer because of the improvements in treatment and care made possible, in part, by the generosity of our supporters.

People with cystic fibrosis are living longer because of the improvements in treatment and care made possible, in part, by the generosity of our supporters.
When we started in 1964, a baby with cystic fibrosis was lucky to reach the age of five. A child born today with cystic fibrosis can expect to live past 41 years, and we are working on making that figure higher.

How Gifts in Wills help
Gifts in Wills are a vital source of funds for our work, making up some 10% of our income. Some of the projects we have funded in recent years have only been possible because of the legacies we have been given.

Our progress
We have made some great steps forwards in recent times, made possible by gifts in wills and donations. Many people don’t consider giving in this way – perhaps because they think they are not wealthy enough, because they have many people and other organisations to provide for, or because they have ‘put off’ writing a will. But no matter what size they are, gifts in wills and other donations have helped us achieve so much and can continue helping us fight for a life unlimited for those with cystic fibrosis. 

As the only national charity dealing with all aspects of cystic fibrosis, we are constantly working to further research, support people with cystic fibrosis and their families, and improve specialist care.

With your help we will continue to fund work to increase the length and quality of life for people with cystic fibrosis.

See why some of our amazing supporters have chosen to remember us with a legacy:

John Stothard

"I've supported the Cystic Fibrosis Trust during my lifetime, so why not after?" 

John Stothard was a committed supporter of the Cystic Fibrosis Trust, and also decided to leave a gift to the Trust in his will.  John explained: "When our son Simon was born we knew very little about cystic fibrosis. Thankfully the Cystic Fibrosis Trust was there to help inform and support us." You name it, John did it in the name of fundraising, from running the Dunstable Group to supporting Simon's Ben Nevis Climb, organising a cycle ride in Germany, and dressing up as Orville. Simon, now 26 years old, had this to say about his dad's efforts to raise funds for the Trust. "My dad gave up so much of his spare time fundraising and helping me train for events to raise money for cystic fibrosis. I could not have done half of the events if it wasn't for him pushing me on."
Sadly John died in 2008 but the way in which he wrote his will meant that he was able to support both his family and the Cystic Fibrosis Trust. When updating his will John had said "it seemed a logical step to include the Cystic Fibrosis Trust. My first concern is to ensure that my family are looked after when I'm gone, but I've supported the Cystic Fibrosis Trust during my lifetime, so why not after?"

He felt the motivations for including the Cystic Fibrosis Trust in his will were very clear: "When Simon was diagnosed, the Trust was there for us. Everyone deserves access to the same support and future that we had. And of course, the research is going well. We're all hoping to see a treatment as soon as possible, but I know the research will not stop there. My legacy will help to enable this. I can't think of a better gift to give, can you?"

Ruby Pike

"I want the charity's excellent work to continue..." 

Ruby Pike, grandmother to Emma and Lucy, explains her decision to include a charity in her will. "Like most people, I've always supported a few special charities. I'm not a wealthy person, so haven't been able to afford to make huge gifts, but I suspect that over the years my donations have mounted up a bit! The idea of making a gift to charity in my will is something that I've only recently heard of, I have no idea why I hadn't considered it before. I think it's a super idea and have taken the decision to include my two favourite charities in my will. I want them to continue their excellent work, even when I'm no longer around to help out. In my own small way, I want to leave the world a better place for my two granddaughters."